The strength and appearance of a person’s nails may indicate overall good health. However, overuse of

The strength and appearance of a person’s nails may indicate overall good health. However, overuse of certain products, poor nutrition, and many other common lifestyle choices can all directly affect the health and vitality of a person’s nails. Weakened, brittle, or soft nails may indicate an underlying condition that requires medical attention, such as liver disease, kidney disease, or psoriasis. However, the way a person treats their nails can also directly affect their health and strength. The following are general tips and tricks people can try to strengthen and maintain the health of their nails: A well balanced, nutritious diet that contains plenty of minerals and vitamins can help with a range of health-related issues — including keeping a person’s nails strong. If a person does not consume enough minerals and vitamins through their diet, they may consider taking a multivitamin. However, always speak to a doctor before taking any multivitamins to ensure they will not interact with existing medications. Biotin is an essential vitamin that helps maintain the health of the nervous system, hair, and nails. Biotin is a B-vitamin that occurs naturally in foods...

A fecal-transplant patient has unexpectedly died just as the FDA is deciding the future of the

A fecal-transplant patient has unexpectedly died just as the FDA is deciding the future of the unconventional procedure. For the past several years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been trying to figure out how to regulate human feces. Fecal transplants are an almost miraculously effective cure for a gut infection called C. diff. The microbes in the stool of a healthy donor repopulate the gut microbiome of a sick patient. But some of those microbes could be dangerous. This month, hypothetical concerns became real when the FDA issued a warning: An immunocompromised patient died after acquiring drug-resistant bacteria from a stool donor. The death was the first of its kind ever recorded, out of tens of thousands of fecal transplants, and it could very well become a flash point in the battle over regulation. “This is an unintended consequence that the FDA’s really been waiting for, because they’ve had concerns for a long time,” said Colleen Kraft, a microbiologist at Emory University. Kraft spoke on a panel at Aspen Ideas: Health, which is co-hosted by the Aspen Institute and The Atlantic. The FDA’s concerns have been evident since it originally proposed to regulate fecal...